Chart Types

By default, Chartio displays your chart’s data as a Table chart. This lets you keep working on your query and preview your full data before selecting a chart type. You can select a bold chart option to preview your data in this format at any time.

If a chart icon is greyed out, the data queried is incompatible with this chart type. To see the data format required for each chart type, click its chart type icon.

If you’re unsure of the best way to display your data, click the Auto button to the left of the chart options and Chartio will auto-select the best-fitting chart type for your data.

chartio icons

Chart Types
Area Bar Bar Line Box Plot
Bubble Map Bubble Bullet Funnel
Heat Map Line Map Pie
Scatter Plot Single Value Indicator Single Value Sparkline
Table

Area

Area chart example

An Area Chart can add depth to your line chart, especially multidimensional data. You can also select a Percent Area Chart, which can help magnify relative differences.

Required dataset format:

Two or more columns. The second through the last column must be numeric. If your chart has two dimensions and one measure, add a Pivot Data step in the Data Pipeline.

Read our guide to area charts for more information on usage and best practices for area charts.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create an Area chart:


Bar

Bar chart

Bar Charts are mainly used to visualize discontinuous (or discrete) data or to show the relationship between a part to a whole. For multidimensional data, you can choose a Stacked Bar Chart, Grouped Bar Chart, or Percent Bar Chart.

To show value labels on bars, open the Chart Settings and check the Value labels checkbox.

Plotting dates on a Bar Chart

Unlike charts meant to show continuous data, such as Line and Scatter Plot charts, Bar Charts don’t sort dates or fill in missing date values. This is because Bar Charts are generally used to display discrete data points. When using a Bar Chart, sort and/or zero-fill your dates in the Data Pipeline as needed.

Required dataset format:
Two or more columns. The second through the last column must be numeric. If your chart has two dimensions and one measure, add a Pivot Data step in the Data Pipeline.

For more information on how to best make use of bar charts, check out our Guide to standard Bar charts, Guide to stacked Bar charts, or Guide to grouped Bar charts.

Check out the videos below to see examples of how to create a Bar chart and stacked Bar chart:


Bar Line

Bar Line ChartsBar Line Charts use a bar and a line to visualize a data set with both a continuous and a categorical metric. They can be especially handy for comparing values against a goal line, or comparing a group of values against an average.

Bar Line charts have a dual Y-axis by default. You can switch to a single Y-axis from within the Chart Settings.

The first column in your query results maps to the X-axis, and the last column maps to the line. Any columns in between will map to one or more bars. Change the value for Last X columns as lines in your Chart Settings as needed.

Required dataset format:
Three or more columns. The second through the last column must be numeric. If your chart has two dimensions and one measure, add a Pivot Data step in the Data Pipeline.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Bar Line chart:


Box Plot

Box Plot

A Box Plot is useful for visualizing the distribution of data based on the following five groupings: lower quartile, upper quartile, minimum, maximum, and median. It is similar to a histogram, but is usually better for showing several simultaneous comparisons-such as data grouped by month, etc.

Required dataset format:
One or two columns. The second column must be numeric.

For more information on the uses and best practices see our tutorial on box plots.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Box Plot:


Bubble Map

Bubble Map

Bubble maps are similar to Bubble Plots and Scatter Plots, but can accept latitude and longitude values. You can choose between the following map options: US, Europe, Africa, Australia/New Zealand, and World.

Required dataset format:
3-5 columns in the following order: label, latitude, longitude, value (optional), and group (optional). Similar to Bubble Plots, a fourth column will become the bubble’s label, and a fifth column will be a category (and group the bubbles with separate colors).

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Bubble Map:


Bubble

Bubble chart

Bubble Plots are similar to Scatter Plot charts, but support three value series instead of two. The first column maps to the x-axis, the second column to the y-axis, and the third column becomes the area of the bubble.

Add an optional fourth and/or fifth column: a fourth column will become the bubble’s label, and a fifth column will be a category (and group the bubbles with separate colors.)

Max bubble size
Set the maximum bubble size in the Series tab of your chart settings.

Required dataset format:
Between 3 and 5 columns. Columns 2 and 3 must be numeric. If 5 columns, the first column must be a date or a number.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Bubble Plot:


Bullet

Bullet chart

Bullet graphs are ideal for displaying single values within some quantitative context, such as a goal value. You can define a maximum of 3 quantitative ranges in your chart settings.

Required dataset format:
One column with one row. Value must be numeric.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Bullet graph:


Funnel

Funnel chart

Funnel charts are often used to visualize optimizations, specifically to see which stages most affect dropoff. Visualizing the dropoffs helps to show the severity and importance of each stage.

Required dataset format:
Two columns. The second column must be numeric.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Funnel chart:


Heat Map

Heat map

Heat Maps display quantitative data as variations in color. Representing values as colors provide slightly less precision, but can allow you to display more data in a smaller area.

To sort the axis values, navigate to the Axis tab of the Chart Settings.

Required dataset format:
Three columns total. Last column must be numeric.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Heat Map:


Line

Line chart

The Line Chart is particularly powerful for conveying changes over time. Generally, line graphs should be used to connect data along an interval scale (a continuous range of quantitative values that are divided into equal intervals, e.g., time.).

Required dataset format:
Two or more columns. The second through last column must be numeric. If your chart has two dimensions and one measure, add a Pivot Data step in the Data Pipeline.

Read our guide to line charts for more information on usage and best practices for line charts.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Line chart:


Map

Map chart

Map Charts are great for visualizing location data. When you choose the Map Chart, Chartio automatically guesses which map you want. You can manually adjust this setting if needed.

Location input types accepted:

Maps available:

  • World map by country
  • US map by state
  • Europe by country
  • Africa by country
  • Australia by state & New Zealand (state abbreviations only)

Required dataset format:
Two columns. The first column should be a location in a recognized format, and the second column must be numeric.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Map chart:


Pie

Pie chart

Pie Charts can be effective in showing the contributions of data segments as a percentage of a whole.

To display your Pie Chart as a Donut Chart, check the Donut chart checkbox in the Chart Settings. Show the total in the center of a Donut chart by checking the Show total in the center checkbox. Format the tooltip values and center total using the Label format setting.

Required dataset format:
Two columns. The second column must be numeric.

Read our guide to pie charts for more information on usage and best practices for pie charts.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Pie chart:


Scatter Plot

Scatterplot chart

Scatter Plots are typically employed to find the relationship between two variables, often quantities.

Check the Linear regression checkbox in the Chart Settings to add a line of best fit to your Scatter Plot.

Required dataset format:
At least two columns. The second through the last column must be numeric.

For more information on the uses and best practices see our tutorial on Scatter Plots.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Scatter Plot:


Single Value Indicator

Single value indicator chart

The Single Value Indicator Chart is similar to the Single Value Chart, except that it allows you to compare your Single Value against another value. It adds an up or down arrow next to the single value and shows the percent change, based on the comparison value.

To change arrow colors, go to Chart Settings > color > use custom colors.

Required dataset format:
Two columns, one row. The first column is displayed on your chart, and the second column is the value being compared against. Note: if you need to put your values in separate datasets, use Cross Join as the merge type.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Single Value Indicator:


Single Value

Single value chart

The Single Value Chart displays one value of any data type.

Required dataset format:
One column with one row.

Trend lines

If your dashboard has Snapshots enabled, you can view a line chart of historical data for your Single Value charts containing numeric values. From the chart’s menu, click View Snapshot Data.

Conditional formatting in Single Value Charts

Change the text color of your Single Value chart when certain conditions are met. In your Single Value chart’s settings, switch to the Conditions tab and click +Add New Conditional Rule.
This feature is compatible with any data type: numeric, date, or text.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Single Value chart:


Sparkline

Sparkline Chart

Sparklines are useful to show trends in a series of values. They can easily highlight increases, decreases, or cycles and can be used to compare multiple items.

To display your Sparkline Chart with area, check the Show area of sparklines checkbox in the Chart Settings Series tab. Show the dots in the line by checking the Show the dots checkbox. Additional settings can be found in the Chart settings menu.

Required dataset format:
Two columns. Additionally, the second through the last column must be numeric. If your chart has two dimensions and one measure, add a Pivot Data step in the Data Pipeline.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Sparkline chart:


Table

Table chart

Tables show the data returned from your data source in a mostly raw format. They can accept an unlimited number of measures and dimensions.

Table chart features

  • Urls are automatically formatted as hyperlinks
  • Format column values (text color, style, date or numeric format)
  • To hide a table chart’s column(s) on the dashboard but use the hidden column(s) in drilldowns and chart exports, hide the column in the Chart Settings
  • Show a totals row and set custom aggregations for each column

Required dataset format:
No formatting restrictions.

Check out the video below to see an example of how to create a Table chart: